IUI 411

WHO THIS POST IS FOR:
  • Couples who starting fertility treatments

Its been a hot minute since I had an IUI. I have met a lot of women recently who are just starting the fertility process and thus I thought it might be helpful to talk about what an IUI is and what to expect during your procedure.

THANK YOUR LUCKY STARS

IUIs are a piece of cake. I say this now but I know at the time I was a nervous wreck. Although in hindsight, I had a hell of a lot more hope. I thought I would go in, wham-bam and be done with all this. IUIs seem like a breeze now because it was the beginning of it all. I know starting infertility is scary but I promise you, be thankful that you are only doing IUIs. If you get pregnant off of one, you are super lucky.

Now that that’s out of the way, what is an IUI?

IUI: Intrauterine insemination

Before heading down the IVF road, your doctor will make you undergo an IUI (or several). Insurance actually requires this. IUI is non-invasive.  During an IUI the sperm has to find the egg, think its sexy- become an embryo,  and implant. In IVF the job of the sperm finding the egg happens in a petri dish (not your body) and is carefully monitored as the embryo grows, the embryo is then put back in your body to implant. With an IUI everything happens inside of YOU. Its less lab like, only one person stares into your vagina. Like I said, in comparison its a cake walk. HOWEVER its still unfair and not comparable to creating babies the “natural” way.

If you have a limited supply of sperm or don’t react to meds, you will be fast tracked to IVF because the probability of you becoming pregnant off an IUI is 20- 25% (the same as two people just trying at home in their comfy bed (age related of course)— I imagine this is how children are made) and time and resources are precious.

Also, according to AmericanPregancy.org, you will not have an IUI if you fall into one of these categories:

  • Women who have severe disease of the fallopian tubes
  • Women with a history of pelvic infections
  • Women with moderate to severe endometriosis
CHLOMID

funny

To prepare you for your IUI you will be put on the infamous Chlomid or something like it. I have met only one woman in my life who wasn’t affected by Chlomid. Most people complain that it makes your mood insane. I personally didnt have mood issues, I had issues with my brain completely malfunctioning. During this period of my life I: yelled at strangers thinking they were friends, walked into walls, showed up to appointments that didn’t exist, triple booked meetings, etc. On Chlomid my brain was like a mush of cotton candy who flew to Phoenix for winter, it was checked out.

Once you know how you will react you can plan accordingly. Maybe you hold off from being super social for the weeks leading up to it.

DOC APPOINTMENTS

You will have a lot of doctors appointment to check your follicles and lining. Right when they think you are going to ovulate, you will have your procedure. This means you will need to be ready to drop your schedule and make it work. Its a lot of pressure because the sperm has to be perfect which means you will have to have sex on specific days leading up to the procedure. Personally for us it was weird because it completely stripped the romance out of creating a child (once again that notion is now long gone).

DAY OF PROCEDURE

When you arrive you will either have your partner provide a specimen or you will give them some from earlier that morning, or the freezer. They will clean the specimen in a machine for about 40 minutes. Essentially they are removing any extra “junk” so that its the purest sperm going towards your eggs. My recommendation, go get brunch so you aren’t sitting there twiddling your fingers.

Once the sperm is “clean”  you will go into the room for your procedure. There are a lot of jokes about being turkey basted BUT that is essentially what they do. Your nurse will place a catheter into your uterus so that the sperm can meet the eggs. This is not comfortable, shocker!

Recommendation: Have your partner hold your hand. Its the most intimate you will be able to get during this.

Once the sperm is inside of you, you will lay there with your booty in the air for 15 minutes (dreamy, right?!). You will then get dressed and wait for two weeks. Its nerve wracking but in the grand scheme of things, its not too bad 🙂

I will be honest, I can’t remember what the aftercare was like. I do know that I ran a 5K while I was waiting so I don’t think it was a lot.

 

-Annie

 

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “IUI 411

  1. Looking back, IUIs were so much less stressful. They were covered by my insurance so I tried multiple times. All the appointments, blood work, injections…it was a lot to handle at the time. Then when I went through IVF it was the most stressful and emotionally draining experience of my life. I wish I could go back for an IUI, but at this point, I know it wouldn’t do me any good. Blah.

    Like

  2. I’ll say that while my last two attempts at IVF have been draining, my 2nd IUI before that was the most painful thing I’ve ever experienced and I knew I’d never do that again – I have a very small cervix and they had to manually dilate it with this horrible torture device (as far as I’m concerned) – it hurt so bad I was dropping f-bombs at my RE… yet my IVF transfers after that? Painless. We haven’t found success yet but our going for our 3rd try at donor egg IVF in a few weeks and are crossing our fingers 🙂

    Like

    1. I am so sorry to hear they were so painful. During my last transfer I had a similar experience, it was traumatizing. The pain was unreal. Thanks for sharing your story, I know a lot of readers come here to learn and your story will help give folks a better picture of what to expect!

      Friends who have donors have all found success. I will be thinking good thoughts for you and sending the good vibes!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s